Scale Auto Replica's

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Revell '41 Willys Street Rod

This isn't the usual type of model I usually build, But a good friend of mine had been asking for a number of years "When are you going to build a Hotrod" ? a Hotrod wasn't on the list of models to build, but after a deal was done, swapping an acrylic display case I was selling, for this model was a good deal.

All my car models are always built to replicate a car sitting in a car showroom, waiting to be sold to it's first owner, and all models are airbrushed in genuine factory colours, with a Hot Rod, the colour can be anything you want, and as I had some Chrysler Neptune blue that I hadn't got any plans to use on anything else, that's the colour I chose for this build.

As with all my models, I usually start on the bodyshell, and this one was no different, so the few mold lines that were present were remove with a medium sanding stick, then washed in warm water with a little dishwashing soap added, then set aside to dry, once dry a few coats of light gray primer was applied to all the body parts, this is a colour i  mix up myself with a 50:50 mix of grey and white primer.

After 24 hours it was given a few coats of the Neptune blue metallic, then left to dry, after a few days any dust nibs, which I'm glad to say, were very few, then after being wiped down with panel wipe, an acrylic clearcoat was applied, once dry, it was wet sanded and polished, the photo's below are after it has been clear coated and the second row are after it's been polished.

After the engine halves had been glued together, I started looking at the chrome parts, there's two complete chrome parts tree in this kit and the chrome is very good, but some parts suffer from mold lines running where you don't want them, and of course will be seen after the model is finished, now I could rectify this in two ways, completely strip the parts, then prime, top coat and then apply Alclad chrome, which I've done on previous models, or try the Molotow liquid chrome pens, I gave these a try out on the Porsche 356, and was pretty pleased with the results, although I did wonder how they would look on larger parts, so I decided to go with the Molotow markers, the first part I tried it on was the supercharger intake, supplied as one part, but it had a mold line running right around the middle of it, this was sanded off and was covered all over using a 4mm chrome pen, the rear trailing arms that fix the axle onto the chassis also need some mold lines removed, and a little sanding to get a good fit on the axle, again they were re-chromed using the 4mm pen, the rear axle (Centre photo) was also done using the 4mm pen.

Before I could go any further on the build, I needed to decide what colour to paint the chassis, I didn't want to go with black, the colour suggested in the instructions, I was thinking of silver, but after talking with a friend that builds a lot of hot rods, decided to go with the same colour used on the body, to make for a stronger joint, the front steering and suspension was fixed to the chassis before giving the chassis a coat of the same primer used for the body, it was then given a few coats of Neptune blue.

For the interior, I was thinking of doing it in two tone, blue and white, but thought in the end it might look a little over the top, so instead went for a simpler colour scheme of a light tan, it was a colour I had mixed up from a few other colours for another build, but never used it, I think it goes well with the blue bodywork, after it had been airbrushed on, the chrome parts, were all picked out again using the Molotow liquid chrome pen, the electric window switches on the centre console were done by pumping out some of the liquid chrome onto a piece of cardboard, and then using the end of a wooden cocktail stick to apply it, the same process was used for the gearlever gate, the chrome dial rings around the dash clocks were done using the 4mm pen, the steering wheel spokes were done using the 1mm pen.

The engine block and gearbox come molded in two halves, and glues together very well, once primed, the gearbox was airbrushed using Testors non buffing steel, which airbrushes straight from the bottle, the engine sump and water pump were airbrushed at the same time, once dry, the gearbox was masked up so the engine block could be painted red, for this I used Tamiya X-7 red, and set aside to dry, when dry, all parts were fitted together with Revell liquid cement.

There a few parts supplied on the chrome parts tree that need to be stripped and painted,I don't like the suggestion in the instruction sheet to simply paint over the chrome, so the parts that needed to be stripped were cut from the parts tree and put into a container containing household bleach and left until all the chrome plating had been removed, once the chrome had gone, the parts were washed under a cold running tap, dried and then given a coat of plastic primer, then airbrushed in their required colours, the carburettors were airbrushed using Alclad aluminium, the supercharger was airbrushed in Testors gunmetal,